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FY2007 Budget Summary

Introduction
President Bush delivered his $2.77 trillion FY2007 budget to Congress on February 6. The budget proposes to cut the deficit by more than 50 percent by 2009. In order to accomplish that goal, overall discretionary spending would be held below the rate of inflation and spending for non-defense programs would be cut below FY2006 levels. Defense spending would increase by 7 percent in FY2007. In addition, the administration proposes the elimination of 141 federal programs totaling almost $15 billion. The budget also calls upon Congress to make the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts permanent and proposes $65.2 billion in mandatory savings over five years through FY2011.

The following summarizes President Bush’s budget proposal for a number of programs important to women and their families. Comparisons to last year’s funding levels reflect allocations provided by Congress in the FY2006 appropriations bills (see The Source, 12/22/05).

Department of Agriculture

Child Nutrition Programs: Under the FY2007 budget, child nutrition programs would receive $13.9 billion, $1.2 billion more than FY2006. Child nutrition programs include the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, the Child and Adult Care Food Program, the Summer Food Service, and the Special Milk Program.

Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP): President Bush’s budget would eliminate the CSFP in FY2007. The program received $108 million in FY2006. Budget documents note that the program is only available in limited areas and often overlaps the Food Stamp Program and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). The Department of Agriculture “intends to pursue a transitional strategy to encourage those women, infants and children that are eligible for WIC to apply for that program, and to encourage elderly CSFP recipients to apply for the Food Stamp Program.”

Food Stamp Program: The administration’s budget would provide $34.8 billion for the Food Stamp Program to serve an estimated 25.9 million participants in FY2007. This amount represents a $5.9 billion decrease below FY2006. The budget “projects modest food price inflation and anticipates a decrease in participation down from a record high in 2006” as hurricane victims transition off the program.

McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program: The FY2007 budget would provide $99 million for the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program in FY2007, a $1 million decrease below FY2006. Implemented in 2003, the program provides U.S. agricultural commodities and financial and technical assistance to carry out preschool and school feeding programs overseas. The program also authorizes maternal, infant, and child nutrition programs with the overall purpose of reducing hunger and malnutrition, and improving literacy and primary education. In 2007, the program is expected to reach over 2.5 million recipients.

Obesity: In FY2007, the Agricultural Research Service would receive $4.7 million to undertake health and obesity prevention research that would “address the efficacy of the healthful eating and physical activity patterns set forth in the Dietary Guidelines in preventing obesity in the U.S. population.” The budget also redirects $6.6 million for research that would “focus on understanding the dietary patterns that contribute to obesity in low socioeconomic and minority populations.”

WIC: Under the administration’s budget, the WIC program would receive a $100 million increase to $5.4 billion.

Department of Education

21st Century Community Learning Centers: The administration’s budget would provide $981.2 million in FY2007 for 21st Century Community Learning Centers. This amount is $10 million below the FY2006 level.

Adult Education: In FY2007, adult education programs would receive a $5.81 million decrease for a total of $579.6 million.

American Competitiveness Initiative: President Bush proposes $380 million in FY2007 for the American Competitiveness Initiative, a multi-agency effort which aims to improve the nation’s long-term economic competitiveness. Programs administered by the Department of Education would strengthen the capacity of schools to improve math and science learning by investing in research, teacher training, and teacher recruitment.

America’s Opportunity Scholarships for Kids: The FY2007 budget proposes $100 million for a new America’s Opportunity Scholarships for Kids program, which would allow students in underperforming schools to transfer to a private school or receive supplemental educational services.

Child Care Access Means Parents in School (CCAMPIS): The CCAMPIS program would receive $15.8 million in FY2007, a $170,000 decrease below FY2006. The program provides grants to establish campus-based child care centers, as well as before- and after-school programs, to assist low-income students who are parents.

Civil Rights Enforcement: The Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights would receive a $1.37 million increase to $92.9 million in FY2007.

Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Grants:President Bush’s budget would level-fund Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Grants at $14.5 million in FY2007. The program supports competitive grants to improve the knowledge and skills of early childhood educators who work in communities that have high concentrations of children living in poverty.

Education for Homeless Children and Youth: The budget would provide $61.9 million for the Education for Homeless Children and Youth program in FY2007, $600,000 less than FY2006.

Educational Technology State Grants: The budget would eliminate funding for Educational Technology State Grants. In FY2006, the program received $272.3 million.

Elementary and Secondary Education (ESEA): The administration’s budget would provide $12.7 billion in FY2007 for Title I grants to local educational agencies under the No Child Left Behind Act (P.L. 107-110). This amount represents a $140 million decrease below the FY2006 level.

Even Start: The William F. Goodling Even Start Family Literacy Program would be eliminated under President Bush’s budget request. Congress allocated $100 million for the program in FY2006.

High School Reform Initiative: The budget proposes $1.48 billion for a new High School Reform initiative, which would include a High School Intervention program and High School Assessments. The initiative would be designed to increase the achievement of at-risk high school students, eliminate gaps in achievement between students from different ethnic and racial groups and disadvantaged students, and enable all high school students to graduate with the education, skills, and knowledge necessary to succeed.

Improving Teacher Quality: The FY2007 budget would level-fund Improving Teacher Quality State Grants at $2.9 billion.

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): Under the budget, IDEA would receive $10.7 billion, a $1.2 billion decrease below FY2006. Of that amount, $380.8 million would be available for preschool grants and $436.4 million would be available for grants for infants and families.

Minority Science and Engineering Improvement: The administration’s budget would provide $8.7 million in FY2007 for the Minority Science and Engineering Improvement program, a $120,000 decrease below FY2006.

Pell Grants: Under the budget, $12.7 billion would be provided for Pell Grants in FY2007, $430 million less than FY2006. The maximum Pell Grant award would be level-funded at $4,050.

Reading First: The Reading First literacy program would receive $1 billion in FY2007, $40 million less than FY2006. In addition, the Early Reading First program would receive $103 million in FY2007, a $1 million decrease below FY2006.

Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities: The budget would provide a $6.3 million decrease to $216 million in FY2007 for programs conducted through the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools.

Vocational Education: Funding for vocational education programs would be eliminated under the FY2007 budget. The administration cites the June 2004 National Assessment of Vocational Education, which “found no evidence that high school vocational education courses themselves contribute to academic achievement or college enrollment.” Congress allocated $1.31 billion for vocational education in FY2006.

Women’s Educational Equity Act (WEEA): WEEA would not receive funding under the FY2007 budget. Congress allocated $2.96 million for the program in FY2006.

Department of Health and Human Services

Administration for Children and Families
The Administration for Children and Families would receive $46.7 billion in FY2007, a $795 million increase over the FY2005 level.

Abandoned Infants Assistance: Programs to increase abandoned infants assistance would be level-funded at $12 million in FY2007.

Abstinence Education: The administration’s budget would increase funding for abstinence education programs by $89.5 million for a total of $204 million in FY2007.

Adoption: Under the FY2007 budget, funding for adoption opportunities would be level-funded at $27 million. The budget would provide $30 million for the Adoption Incentives program, $12 million more than FY2006. In addition, $13 million would be provided for adoption awareness programs, a $200,000 increase over FY2006.

Child Abuse and Neglect Treatment/Prevention Activities: The FY2007 budget would provide level funding of $95 million for child abuse and neglect treatment and prevention activities.

Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG): The CCDBG would receive $2.06 billion in FY2007, a $20 million decrease below FY2006.

Child Support Enforcement: Under the FY2007 budget, $4.1 billion would be provided for payments to states for child support enforcement and family support programs. This amount is $900 million below the FY2006 level. The budget also includes proposals to increase child support collections and to direct more of these payments to families.

Child Welfare Programs: The FY2007 budget would provide $294 million for child welfare programs, $4.35 million more than FY2006. The administration’s budget proposes legislation that would give states the option to participate in an alternative financing system for child welfare intended to better meet the needs of each state’s foster care populations. Under the plan, states choosing to participate would receive funds in flexible grants.

Consolidated Runaway and Homeless Youth Programs: The administration’s budget would provide $103 million for consolidated runaway and homeless youth programs in FY2006. This amount is $14.3 million above the FY2006 level.

Faith-based and Community Initiatives Programs: President Bush proposes $141 million for faith-based and community organizations, $26 million more than FY2006.

Foster Care Independent Living Program: The administration proposes $46 million for an initiative to help older foster care youth transition to adulthood and self-sufficiency after leaving foster care. Under the proposal, vouchers of up to $5,000 would be provided for education or vocational training to help youth aging out of foster care to develop the skills to lead independent and productive lives.

Head Start: The FY2007 budget would provide $6.79 billion for Head Start, a $50 million decrease below FY2006.

Healthy Marriages and Responsible Fatherhood: The administration’s budget would provide $250 million for programs to support healthy marriages and responsible fatherhood. Of this amount, $100 million would be provided for states, territories, and tribal organizations to develop innovative approaches to promote healthy marriages; and $150 million would be provided for research, demonstration projects, and technical assistance focusing on family formation and healthy marriage. Of this amount, up to $50 million could be provided for a program to help non-custodial fathers become more involved in their children’s lives. Funding for these programs would be offset by reductions in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families High Performance Bonus and the Out-of-Wedlock Birth Bonus.

Mentoring Children of Prisoners: In FY2007, the Mentoring Children of Prisoners program would receive $40 million, $10 million less than FY2006.

Promoting Safe and Stable Families: The administration’s budget would provide a $40 million increase for the Promoting Safe and Stable Families program, bringing the total to $345 million in FY2007.

Refugee and Entrant Assistance: Programs to assist refugees, individuals seeking asylum, and trafficking victims would receive $500 million in FY2007, a $7 million increase above the FY2006 level. The total would include $15 million for a program to aid victims of trafficking, a $5.08 million increase over FY2006.

Social Services Block Grant: The Social Services Block Grant would receive $1.2 billion in FY2007, $500 million less than FY2006.

Unaccompanied Alien Children: The FY2007 budget would provide $105 million for the Unaccompanied Alien Children program, $26.9 million more than FY2006. The program provides a safe environment for minors until custody can be transferred to a relative or appropriate guardian or until the child is returned to his or her country of origin.

Violence Against Women Act (VAWA): The administration’s budget would provide level funding of $3 million for the National Domestic Violence Hotline in FY2007. Battered women’s shelters would receive $125 million, a $1 million decrease below FY2006.

Administration on Aging
The FY2007 budget would provide $1.3 billion for the Administration on Aging, $40 million less than FY2006.

National Family Caregiver Support Program: In FY2007, the National Family Caregiver Support Program would receive $160 million, $2.3 million more than FY2006.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)
The FY2007 budget would provide $319 million for AHRQ, a $300,000 increase over FY2006.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
The CDC would receive $5.81 billion in FY2007, $70 million less than FY2006.

Birth Defects, Developmental Disabilities, Disability and Health:Under the FY2007 budget, programs for the prevention of birth defects, developmental disabilities, disability and health activities would receive $110 million, a $16 million decrease below the FY2006 level.

Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion: The administration’s budget would provide $819 million for chronic disease prevention and health promotion, $26 million less than FY2006.

HIV/AIDS: The FY2006 budget would provide $1 billion for HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and tuberculosis prevention at the CDC, an increase of $43.9 million above the FY2006 level. Of that amount, $122 million would be provided for global HIV/AIDS activities.

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)
The CMS would receive $565.06 billion in FY2006, an $84.62 billion increase over FY2005.

Medicaid: Under the administration’s budget, the federal share of Medicaid benefits is expected to be $199.45 billion, $7.11 billion more than FY2006. The FY2007 budget would extend Transitional Medical Assistance (TMA) through September 30, 2007.

Medicare: In FY2007, spending on Medicare benefits would total $449.2 billion, an increase of $59.8 billion over FY2006.

State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP): The administration’s budget would provide $5.24 billion for SCHIP in FY2007, $540 million more than FY2006. Under the budget proposal, all Medicaid and SCHIP funding would be combined for states choosing to participate in the Health Insurance Flexibility and Accountability (HIFA) demonstration initiative. HIFA enables states to use Medicaid and SCHIP funds in concert with private insurance options to expand coverage to low-income, uninsured individuals, with a focus on those with incomes at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level. The President first proposed HIFA in 2001, and as of November 2005, HIFA demonstrations have expanded coverage to 800,000 people.

President Bush also proposes a new initiative called Cover the Kids. Under this proposal, grants would be provided to states, schools, and community organizations in order to enroll and provide coverage to children eligible for, but not yet enrolled in, Medicaid and SCHIP. In FY2007, $100 million would be included for the program.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
The FY2007 budget would provide $1.9 billion for the FDA, a $400 million increase above the FY2006 level.

User Fees: The FDA estimates it will collect $18 million in user fees under the Mammography Quality Standards Act, $1 million more than FY2006. In addition, the FDA estimates it will collect $321 million under the Prescription Drug User Fee Act, $16 million more than the FY2006 level.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
The FY2007 budget would provide $6.4 billion for HRSA, $160 million less than FY2006.

Community Health Centers: Under the FY2007 budget, community health centers would receive $1.96 billion, a $160 million increase over FY2006. This funding increase will allow for the creation of 300 new or expanded health center sites to serve an additional 1.2 million individuals.

Cord Blood Stem Cell Bank: The FY2007 budget would provide no new funding for the National Cord Blood Stem Cell Bank program. HRSA explains that funds provided in FY2004 through FY2006 will support the collection of approximately 13,800 new cord blood units by the end of FY2007.

Family Planning: Title X, the nation’s family planning program, would receive $283 million in FY2007, $3 million less than FY2006.

Healthy Start: Under the administration’s budget, the Healthy Start infant mortality initiative would receive $102 million, a $500,000 decrease below the FY2006 level.

Maternal and Child Health Block Grant: In FY2007, the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant would receive $693 million, a $7 million decrease below FY2006.

Ryan White: The Ryan White Care Act would receive $2.16 billion in FY2007, an $80 million increase above FY2006. The total would include $95 million for a new domestic HIV/AIDS initiative that aims to address the ongoing problem of state waiting lists and provide care and lifesaving medications to newly diagnosed individuals.

Universal Newborn Hearing: The administration’s budget would provide no funding for the universal newborn hearing program. In FY2006, Congress allocated $9.9 million for the program.

Indian Health Services (IHS)
Under the FY2007 budget, IHS would receive $4 billion, an increase of $124 million over FY2006.

National Institutes of Health (NIH)
The FY2007 budget would provide $28.6 billion for the NIH, a decrease of $200 million below FY2006.

Minority Health: The administration’s budget would provide $194 million for the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities, $1 million less than FY2006.

Office of the Secretary
Adolescent Family Life: The Adolescent Family Life program would receive $30 million in FY2007, a $740,000 decrease below FY2006.

Afghanistan: President Bush proposes $6.02 million in FY2007 to continue HHS health care initiatives in Afghanistan, particularly in the areas of maternal and child health. This amount is $70,000 above the FY2006 level.

Embryo Adoption Awareness Campaign: In FY2007, the embryo adoption awareness campaign would be level-funded at $2 million.

Minority HIV/AIDS: The FY2007 budget would provide $51.9 million for efforts to address the prevention and treatment needs of minority communities heavily impacted by HIV/AIDS. This amount is $52,000 less than FY2006.

National Abstinence Education Campaign: Under the administration’s budget, the Office of the Secretary could use up to $10 million for a public awareness campaign designed to help parents communicate with their children about the health risks of early sexual activity.

Public Health Service’s Office of Minority Health: The Office of Minority Health would receive $46 million in FY2007, $11.24 million below the FY2006 level.

Public Health Service’s Office on Women’s Health: In FY2007, the Office on Women’s Health would receive $28 million, $72,000 less than FY2006.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
SAMHSA would receive $3.3 billion in FY2007, $60 million less than FY2006.

Mental Health Services: The FY2007 budget would provide $849 million for mental health services, a decrease of $22.2 million below the FY2006 level. Of this amount, $428 million would be provided for the mental health block grant.

Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment (SAPT) Block Grant: The SAPT Block Grant would be level-funded at $1.76 billion in FY2007.

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

American Dream Downpayment Initiative: The FY2007 budget would provide $100 million for the American Dream Downpayment Initiative to help low-income families purchase their first homes. The program received $25 million in FY2006.

Fair Housing: Under the FY2007 budget, $45 million would be provided for fair housing activities, $1.5 million less than FY2006. Of that amount, the Fair Housing Assistance Program would receive $25 million, a $1 million decrease below FY2006. In addition, the Fair Housing Initiatives Program would be level-funded at $20 million.

Healthy Homes Initiative: The administration’s budget would provide level funding of $9 million for the Healthy Homes Initiative. The initiative targets funding to prevent housing-related childhood diseases and injuries such as asthma and carbon monoxide poisoning.

Homeless Housing: Homeless assistance grants would receive $1.5 billion in FY2007, $160 million more than FY2006. The total would include $285 million to renew all expiring Shelter Plus Care contracts, a $47 million increase over FY2006. HUD estimates that the increase would help create and run approximately 12,000 new units of supportive housing for the chronically homeless.

Housing Counseling: The administration’s budget proposes $45 million for housing counseling assistance in FY2007, $3 million more than FY2006. This funding would assist approximately 600,000 families to prepare for homeownership, identify predatory lending practices, and avoid defaulting on their homes.

Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA): The HOPWA program would receive $300 million in FY2007, an $11 million increase over FY2006. The program provides states and localities with resources and incentives to devise long-term comprehensive strategies for meeting the housing needs of persons with HIV/AIDS and their families. The requested funding would support 75,025 households.

Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation: In FY2007, the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation would receive $120 million to provide direct assistance to over 180,000 families through affordable mortgage and rehabilitation lending, comprehensive homebuyer education, and counseling services. The corporation received $118 million in FY2006.

Samaritan Initiative: The FY2007 budget proposes $200 million for the Samaritan Housing Initiative, a new program designed to move chronically homeless persons from the streets to safe permanent housing with supportive services.

Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program: The administration proposes a $300 million increase to $15.9 billion in FY2007 for Section 8 voucher renewals.

Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP): The FY2007 budget would provide $40 million for the SHOP program, a $20 million increase above the FY2006 level. The program provides grants to nonprofit organizations to subsidize the costs of land acquisition and infrastructure improvements. Homeowners are required to contribute volunteer labor to the construction or rehabilitation of the property.

Youthbuild: Under the administration’s budget, the Youthbuild program would be transferred from HUD to the Department of Labor “to allow for greater coordination of the program with Job Corps and other employment and training programs.” Congress allocated $50 million to HUD for the Youthbuild program in FY2006.

Department of Justice

Juvenile Assistance
Under the administration’s budget, a number of programs would be transferred from the Office of Justice Programs and the State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance account to the Justice Assistance account.

Boys and Girls Clubs: The FY2007 budget would provide $59.5 million for the Boys and Girls Clubs, $25.5 million less than FY2006.

DNA Initiative: The administration’s budget would provide $175.6 million in FY2007 for the DNA analysis and capacity enhancement program. Of this amount, no less than $151 million should be made available to reduce and eliminate the backlog of DNA samples and to increase state and local DNA laboratory capacity. Congress allocated $108.5 million in FY2006.

Missing Children’s Program: The Missing Children’s Program would receive $50.9 million in FY2007, $2.9 million more than FY2006. The total would include $15.4 million for the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, $900,000 more than FY2006. In addition, the AMBER Alert program would be level-funded at $5 million.

Prison Rape: The FY2007 budget would provide $1.98 million for prison rape prevention and prosecution programs. This amount is $16.2 million less than FY2006.

Project Safe Neighborhoods Initiative: President Bush proposes $165.9 million in FY2007 for the Project Safe Neighborhoods Initiative, which aims to assist communities and private citizens in protecting neighborhoods against the threats of violent crime, gang-related violence, and drug trafficking. The total would include $2.9 million for the National Stalker and Domestic Violence Database, $60,000 less than FY2006.

Trafficking: The administration’s budget would provide $1.49 million for a program to assist victims of trafficking, an $8.51 million decrease below FY2006. In addition, $20 million would be provided for a new grant program to investigate and prosecute acts of severe forms of trafficking within the United States.

In addition, the FY2007 budget would provide $33.5 million for juvenile delinquency prevention block grants, $2.26 million for child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and practitioners, $11.7 million for improving the investigation and prosecution of child abuse, $11.8 million for the court appointed special advocates program, and $1.98 million for the National Sex Offender Public Registry.

Office on Violence Against Women
In January 2005, the Office on Violence Against Women was established as an independent office within the Department of Justice.

Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Prevention and Prosecution Programs: The administration’s budget would provide $347 million for VAWA programs, $39.5 million less than FY2006. The following VAWA programs would be funded:

  • $173 million for grants to combat violent crimes against women, including $2.5 million for the National Institute of Justice for research and evaluation of violence against women; and $14.9 million for transitional housing assistance grants for victims of domestic violence, stalking, or sexual assault;
  • $55.2 million for grants to encourage arrest policies;
  • $38.8 million for rural domestic violence and child abuse enforcement assistance grants;
  • $9 million to reduce violent crimes against women on college campuses;
  • $45.8 million for legal assistance for victims;
  • $4.5 million for enhancing protection for older and disabled women from domestic violence and sexual assault;
  • $13.8 million for safe havens for children; and
  • $7.1 million for education and training to end violence against and abuse of women with disabilities.Department of LaborCareer Advancement Accounts: President Bush proposes $3.41 billion in FY2007 for new Career Advancement Accounts, which are “self-directed accounts that workers entering the workforce or transitioning between jobs and careers, or incumbent workers in need of new skills to remain employed, can use to purchase education and training.” Budget documents estimate that the new accounts will support approximately 13.7 million participants. Funds previously appropriated for the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) adult program, the dislocated worker program, the Employment Service State Grant program, and youth activities would be consolidated into a single funding stream for the accounts. In FY2006, Congress allocated $1.48 billion for dislocated worker assistance.

    Civil Rights Enforcement: The Office of Civil Rights would receive $6.7 million in FY2007, an increase of $300,000 over the FY2006 level.

    Community College Initiative: The FY2007 budget would provide $150 million for the Community College Initiative, a $25 million increase over FY2006. The initiative consists of an employer-focused grant program and requires applicants to prepare training plans with community colleges and employers.

    International Labor Affairs: The Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB) would receive a $60.9 million decrease to $12.4 million in FY2007. According to the Department of Labor, “The budget returns ILAB to its core mission of research and advocacy. At the requested level ILAB will continue to assist in formulating the U.S. international policies and programs of concern to American workers and will provide expert support for many of the Administration’s international initiatives.”

    Job Corps: Under the budget, $1.5 billion would be provided for Job Corps in FY2007. This amount represents a $70 million decrease below FY2006.

    Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA): The budget would provide an $11.2 million increase to $483.7 million for OSHA in FY2007.

    Prisoner Re-entry Initiative: The budget would provide $19.6 million for the Department of Labor’s portion of the prisoner re-entry initiative to help individuals exiting prison make a successful transition to community life and employment. Congress allocated $19.84 billion for the program in FY2006.

    Youthbuild: Under the FY2007 budget, the Youthbuild program would be transferred from HUD to the Department of Labor and level-funded at $50 million. The program targets high school dropouts ages 16 to 24 and provides them with education and employment skills through the construction and rehabilitation of housing for low-income and homeless people.

    Women’s Bureau: The Department of Labor’s Women’s Bureau would receive $9.3 million in FY2007, a $460,000 decrease below FY2006. The Women’s Bureau “designs projects addressing issues of importance to working women, provides information about innovative women’s programs, and advises and assists in the development of Departmental policies and programs related to or affecting women.”

    Department of State

    Afghanistan: The administration’s budget would provide $610 million for Afghanistan in FY2007, a $180 million increase over FY2006.

    Child Survival and Health Programs Fund: Under the budget, $1.43 billion would be provided for the Child Survival and Health Programs Fund in FY2007, $150 million less than FY2006. The total would include $323 million for child survival and maternal health, a $37 million decrease below the FY2006 level. In addition, $9 million would be provided to address the needs of orphans and displaced children. This amount represents a $6 million increase over FY2006.

    Food for Peace: The FY2007 budget would provide $1.22 billion for the Food for Peace program, $20 million more than FY2006. In addition, the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program would receive $99 million in FY2007, a $1 million decrease below the FY2006 level.

    HIV/AIDS: The administration’s budget would provide $4 billion in FY2007 for HIV/AIDS prevention activities, $1.2 billion more than FY2006. The total would include $2.89 billion for the Global HIV/AIDS Initiative, a $900 million increase over FY2006. In addition, $200 million would be provided for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. This amount is $250 million less than FY2006.

    International Family Planning: International family planning programs would receive $294 million in FY2007, $138 million less than FY2006.

    Middle East Partnership Initiative: The FY2007 budget would provide $120 million for the Middle East Partnership Initiative to support democracy in the Middle East by encouraging political, economic and educational reform and empowerment of women. This amount is $10 million above the FY2006 level.

    Millennium Challenge Corporation: Under the administration’s budget, the Millennium Challenge Corporation would receive $3 billion, an increase of $1.23 billion over FY2006.

    Peace Corps: The budget would provide $337 million for the Peace Corps in FY2007, $15 million more than FY2006.

    Trafficking: In FY2007, $8.5 million would be provided for programs to combat trafficking in persons, a $4.5 million increase over FY2006.

    Sudan: In FY2007, $60 million would be provided for humanitarian assistance for the Darfur region of Sudan. Congress allocated $70 million in FY2006.

    United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF): Under the administration’s budget, the United States contribution to UNICEF would be $123 million, $4 million less than FY2006.

    United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM): In FY2007, the United States would contribute $1 million to UNIFEM, $2.25 million less than FY2006.

    United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA): The FY2007 budget would allow up to $25 million as a U.S. contribution to UNFPA, a $9 million decrease below FY2006. The administration has blocked the release of all UNFPA funds in fiscal years 2002 through 2005. At this time, it remains unclear as to whether the FY2006 funds will be released.

    United States Agency for International Development (USAID): Under the administration’s budget, $1.28 billion would be provided for development assistance for USAID, $240 million less than FY2006.

    Women’s Justice and Empowerment Initiative: President Bush proposes $7.3 million in FY2007 for a new initiative to combat sexual violence against women in Africa through projects designed to increase awareness of violence against women and the need to empower women to prevent violence and to achieve justice through the legal system. Program components also would strengthen the capacity of the legal system to protect women and punish perpetrators of violence, as well as to address the physical and mental health needs of victims of violence.

    Department of Transportation

    Minority Business Resource Center: The FY2007 budget would provide $2.97 million for outreach activities at the Minority Business Resource Center. This amount represents a $30,000 decrease below the FY2006 level.

    Occupant Protection Incentive Grants: Occupant protection incentive grants would receive a $1 million increase to $25 million in FY2007. In addition, level funding of $6 million would be provided for child safety and booster seat grants.

    Independent Agencies

    Commission on Civil Rights
    In FY2007, the Commission on Civil Rights would receive $9.31 million, a $270,000 increase over FY2006.

    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
    The FY2007 budget would provide $323 million for the EEOC, a decrease of $8.23 million below the FY2006 level.

    Legal Services Corporation (LSC)
    The administration’s budget would provide $310.9 million for the LSC in FY2007, $20.1 million less than FY2006.

    National Science Foundation (NSF)
    Under the budget, $6.02 billion would be provided for the NSF in FY2007, $370 million more than FY2006.

    Math and Science Partnership: The Math and Science Partnership program would receive $46 million in FY2007, a decrease of $18 million below the FY2006 level.

    Small Business Administration (SBA) The administration’s budget would provide $624 million for the SBA in FY2007, $168 million more than FY2006.

    Women’s Business Centers: Women’s Business Centers would receive $12 million in FY2007, $500,000 less than FY2006. In addition, $743,000 would be provided for the National Women’s Business Council, a $7,000 decrease below FY2006.

    General Government
    The budget proposal would renew legislative language requiring health plans participating in the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP) to cover prescription contraceptives if they cover other prescription drugs.

    The administration’s budget also would renew language permitting a woman to breastfeed her child in a federal building or on federal property if she and her child are authorized to be present at the location.

    Tax Relief
    The budget proposes to make permanent the tax provisions included in the 2003 tax law (P.L. 108-27) that are set to expire in 2007 and 2008. These include: increasing the child tax credit, expanding the 10 percent income tax bracket, and expanding the standard deduction and 15 percent income tax bracket for married taxpayers filing jointly.

    The budget also proposes to make permanent the provisions of the 2001 tax law (P.L. 107-16), which will sunset on December 31, 2010.

    Health Care
    President Bush proposes several new programs to address the problems of rising health care costs and the uninsured. The plan includes reforms to Medicare and Medicaid, an expansion of Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), Association Health Plans (AHPs) for small businesses, medical liability reform, and electronic health records for all Americans.

    The budget plan proposes to slow growth in Medicare spending to achieve $35.9 billion in savings over five years. The proposal would include support for quality care initiatives; competitive bidding for clinical laboratory services, physician-administered drugs, and medical supplies and equipment; and advances in medical technologies and the delivery of care. In addition, the proposal aims to strengthen the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003 (P.L. 108-173) by automatically slowing the rate of Medicare growth if general revenues account for 45 percent of its payments. Under the plan, there would be a four-tenths of a percent reduction for all provider payments the year the MMA threshold is exceeded. The reduction would grow by the same amount every year until the shortfall has been eliminated.

    Building on Medicaid reforms contained in the FY2006 spending reconciliation bill (S. 1932), the administration proposes $40 million in savings over five years by modifying the federal-state matching rate and reimbursement policies for certain health care services, and further reducing overpayments for prescription drugs.

    The budget proposes a number of tax incentives to encourage the use of HSAs in conjunction with a high-deductible insurance plan. In addition, the administration plans to submit a proposal that would allow individuals to keep their high-deductible insurance plan and HSA when they change jobs or move out of state.

    President Bush again requests that Congress enact legislation establishing AHPs, which would allow small businesses to join together through industry and professional associations to purchase affordable health benefits for their workers.

    Personal Savings
    President Bush repeats his call for Social Security reform. Under the proposal, the program would be made sustainable by indexing benefits for wealthier workers to inflation instead of wage growth. Budget documents state that “by complementing this reform with voluntary personal retirement accounts for each worker born after 1949, with the money coming from a portion of a worker’s payroll taxes, younger workers would have an opportunity to earn higher yields than are possible in the current system, while building a retirement asset they can call their own.”

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